The U.S. Supreme Court decided that the United States can ban entry by persons from Muslim countries, partially and temporarily upholding the Executive Order travel ban. Travelers from Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Somalia, and Yemen are barred from coming to the United States unless they have a bona fide, well-documented connection to a U.S. person or entity. The timeframe appears to be from June 29, 2017 for 90 days to September 27, 2017. For refugees, the timeframe appears to be 120 days, to October 27, 2017.

There does not appear to be any basis for revoking previously approved visas.  However, the ruling could cause confusion in particular for those with plans to come to the U.S. on tourism or for business visits.  B-1 and B-2 visa applications for business or tourism may be denied, and B-1/B-2 travelers may be refused entry at U.S. airports and ports of entry if the Immigration Officer is not convinced the traveler meets the “bona fide connection” standard. But foreign workers from the countries with approved visas, such as H-1B workers; F-1 students; J-1 exchange visitors; K-1 fiancés ; L-1 intracompany executive, manager, and specialized knowledge transferees; O-1 extraordinary ability personnel; P-1 performers; R-1 religious workers; and E-2 investors; should be allowed entry. It is unclear how dual citizens, such as dual Iranian-Canadian citizens will be treated under the ruling.  Green card holders should not be affected.

The Supreme Court issued the ruling on June 26, 2017, and will hear full oral argument in the Fall of 2017.